Author: HistRevAdmin

Tapping Productivity: Shock Work, Stakhanovism, and Working Class Identity in Central Asia

Tapping Productivity:  Shock Work, Stakhanovism, and Working Class Identity in Central Asia

Abstract: While Central Asia was seen as a wasteland of “backwardness” in the 1910s, it had become a collection of politically significant nations within the USSR only a few decades later. This paper argues that the productivity campaigns of the Soviet Union were essential in expanding opportunities for the indigenous in Central Asia.

Valjean’s Escape: Photographs of Haussmann’s Underground Paris

Valjean’s Escape: Photographs of Haussmann’s Underground Paris

(Volume III, Issue 2)
Abstract: While traditional accounts of the Haussmann reconstruction of Paris allege that the reconstruction was completed for military reasons, namely to ensure government control of the city, this paper proposes a second cause: sanitation. By examining the prints of photographer Felix Nadar, it becomes obvious that sanitation played a key role in the Haussman reconstruction.

Mask of Masculinity:
American Women’s Dual Behavior During World War II

Mask of Masculinity:  American Women’s Dual Behavior During World War II

Kelsey Clinton (Vanderbilt University class of 2018) – In September of 1939, American political journalist, Norman Cousins, offered the following solution to the Depression, “Simply fire the women, who shouldn’t be working anyway, and hire the men.” During the same month, events occurred in Europe that would ultimately make Cousins’ solution infeasible. Hitler’s invasion of Poland set the stage for World War II. Not only were women expected to replace men who were leaving to go fight in the war, but they were also expected to maintain pre-conflict duties, such as taking care of children, being good wives, and upholding a feminine sexual appeal.